Friends Don’t Let Friends Plan Suicides

Friends Don’t Let Friends Plan Suicides

9 Resources for Supporting a Pregnant Mom-to-Be Amid COVID-19

9 Resources for Supporting a Pregnant Mom-to-Be Amid COVID-19

by Emily Graham

Are you looking for ways to support a pregnant friend, spouse, or loved one during the coronavirus crisis? These nine resources from PDX Local can help you to be the friend, partner, spouse, or parent your loved one needs during this emotionally challenging — and potentially isolating — time in her life. 

 

How to Support Your Expectant Loved One

 

Pregnancy isn’t easy in the midst of a pandemic, but there are things you can do to take some of the weight off your pregnant loved one’s shoulders. 

 

  • First, take the time to understand what your pregnant loved one is going through. Many pregnant and postpartum women are feeling stressed, anxious, and socially isolated as they attempt to protect themselves and their babies from the coronavirus. 
  • Provide your pregnant friend with the support she needs during the pandemic with these five tips from Thrive Global.
  • Plan a distanced baby shower for your mother-to-be. Several safe alternatives to in-person parties include drive-by baby showers, virtual events, and tailgate showers. 

 

Gift Ideas for Pregnant Mothers

 

These resources will help you to give your expectant or postpartum loved one everything she needs to navigate pregnancy and motherhood. 

 

  • Explore the 50 best gifts for pregnant and postpartum mothers, including memory books, holiday ornaments, and handprint photo frames. 
  • Give mom-to-be the gift of a meal subscription box. Several options include Blue Apron, HelloFresh, and Martha and Marley Spoon. 
  • Check out the PDX Local Wellness Gift Guide for more than 50 potential gift ideas that can be purchased now or in time for the holidays. 

 

Tips to Save on Pregnancy Gifts

 

You don’t need to spend a fortune on pregnancy gifts to support an expectant loved one during the pandemic. These three resources can help you save on your purchases and make a few DIY gifts for your pregnant loved one. 

 

  • Use deal websites to find savings on purchases from clothing retailers like Old Navy. You can find Old Navy cash back offers, promo codes, and coupons — helping you to save on maternity apparel for your pregnant loved one. 
  • Make a DIY gift for your pregnant loved one. DIYS.com offers 20 do-it-yourself gift ideas for expectant mothers, including a two-seam maternity dress, pregnancy journal, brunch basket, and herbal foot soak. 
  • Look for deals on baby essentials while shopping on Amazon.com, visiting thrift stores, or buying from Target. 

 

While preparing for the arrival of a new baby is rarely simple, the pandemic has made pregnancy and childbirth even more difficult for many expectant and new mothers around the world. However, your support can make a world of difference as your loved one prepares for the birth of her new baby, and learns to navigate pregnancy in the midst of a pandemic.


 

Emily Graham is the creator of Mighty Moms. She believes being a mom is one of the hardest jobs around and wanted to create a support system for moms from all walks of life. On her site, she offers a wide range of info tailored for busy moms — from how to reduce stress to creative ways to spend time together as a family.

First Aid for Attempted Suicide

First Aid for Attempted Suicide

First Aid for Attempted Suicide

Article by .  Reprinted with permission from https://pacificmedicalacls.com.

Suicide touches all ages and incomes; all racial, ethnic, and religious groups; and in all parts of the country. It is a leading cause of death in the US.

As self-inflicted injuries increase so does the need to prepare for encountering someone who has attempted suicide. As a first-aid provider, you have a vital role in addressing immediate medical needs. You can also provide clarity and support to the victim and other people at the scene.

In 2017, guns were the most common method of death by suicide, accounting for a little more than half of all suicide deaths. The next most common methods were suffocation at 27.72 percent, and poisoning at 13.89 percent.

The following first-aid recommendations are for each of the most common methods of attempted suicide. Each case is unique, and it is essential to tailor your care and support to that person’s needs.

Above all ensure the safety of everyone present and address any serious medical needs first.

Suicide prevention

© Staff Sgt. Natasha Stannard / Joint Base Langley-Eustis / CC-BY-SA-3.0

 

First Aid for Gunshot Wound

A self-inflicted gunshot wound (SIGW)—or any gunshot wound—to the head is correlated with severe disability and a high mortality rate. There is a greater chance of death caused by SIGWs compared to victims injured by gunshot wounds that are delivered in an assault or by accident.

  • Head trauma from a gunshot wound is fatal in about 90 percent of cases, with many victims dying prior to arriving at the hospital.
  • About 50 percent of the victims that survive the initial trauma die in the emergency department.
  • Head trauma from a gunshot wound is the cause of approximately 35 percent of deaths attributed to traumatic brain injury.

Although the head is the most commonly injured body region during a suicide attempt, the following is a general guideline for how to approach a gunshot wound on any area of the body.

  • Ensure your safety. Ensure the scene is safe and immediately call or have someone else call 9-1-1 or emergency medical services.
  • Locate the source of the bleeding. Attempt to open or remove the clothing over the wound so you can see it—this will allow you to see injuries that may have been covered or hidden.
  • Stop the bleeding. Pressure to stop the bleeding is the most critical intervention. If the victim has blood that is coming out of a hole, put steady pressure on it with both hands by pushing down as hard as you can.
  • Use a dressing (towels, shirts, gauze, etc.). Dressings will help seal the wound and aid in clotting.
  • Elevate the extremity. If the gunshot wound is above the waist do not elevate the legs to treat for shock (unless the injury is in the arm). Gunshot wounds to the chest and abdomen will bleed more rapidly if the legs are elevated, thus making it more difficult for the individual to breathe.
  • If you can, use a tourniquet. Tourniquets will only work on arm and leg injuries. Using them correctly takes practice, and they should only be used if the bleeding cannot be stopped when direct pressure and elevation are applied immediately and simultaneously or if there is a reason why direct pressure cannot be maintained.
  • Gunshot wounds to the chest may be sealed with a type of plastic to keep air from being sucked into the wound—this can help prevent a collapsed lung. Remove the seal if shortness of breath worsens after sealing the wound.
  • Chest compressions in a cardiac arrest caused by hemorrhagic shock from severe blood loss may worsen the situation.

First Aid for Hanging or Suffocation

Self-administered and assisted suicides by asphyxiation—the process of being deprived of oxygen resulting in unconsciousness or death—can be done by several methods. The use of a plastic bag, or suicide bag, is often in conjunction with a flow of an inert gas like nitrogen or helium.

Suicides using a plastic bag with helium were first recorded in the 90s. Since the 2000s, guides on how to use this method have spread on the internet, in print, and on video; and the frequency of suicides by this technique has increased.

Asphyxiation is also present in hanging and strangling. Both hanging and strangling can obstruct blood flow to and from the brain as well as block air flow to and from the lungs.

How to Recognize Suffocation

  • A constricting article is around the neck
  • Marks around the victim’s neck where a constriction was removed
  • Impaired consciousness or unconscious
  • Grey-blue skin (cyanosis)
  • Uneven breathing
  • Prominent veins and congestion of the face
  • Petechiae – tiny red spots on the face or the whites of the eyes

What to Do in the Case of Suffocation

  • Make sure the scene is safe, and immediately remove any constriction from around the victim’s neck; support the body if it is still hanging.
  • Call or have someone else call 9-1-1 or emergency services.
  • Lay the victim on the floor. In the case of spinal injury, don’t move the victim unnecessarily.
  • Check for breathing and pulse; If not breathing begin CPR.
  • If breathing, place in the recovery position and monitor until emergency responders arrive.
  • Don’t interfere with or destroy any material, such as a knotted rope, that police may need as evidence.

First Aid for Overdose or Poisoning

Poisoning is due to swallowing, inhaling, touching, or injecting various chemicals, drugs, gases, or venoms. Both suicide and unintentional drug overdoses kill adults at twice the rate today as they did two decades ago, and opioids are a key contributor to this rise. The following focuses on the use of drugs as a means of attempting suicide.

When a drug overdose is suspected, you may not know what drug the person was taking. Often, an overdose victim will either be unconscious or not fully conscious of their surroundings. Because of this, it is imperative to recognize the general signs of a drug overdose and what to do for first aid in the majority of situations.

How to Recognize an Overdose

  • Unusual sleepiness or unresponsiveness
  • Confusion, disorientation, or hallucination
  • Slow, shallow, irregular, or absent breathing
  • Bradycardia (slow heartbeat) or hypotension (low blood pressure)
  • Cold and clammy skin
  • Constricted pupils (small or pinpoint pupils)
  • Cyanotic (nails and lips are blue)
  • Mood changes, including aggression, agitation, anxiety, or depression
  • Abdominal pain or vomiting
  • Loss of coordination or motor control

Do’s for Drug Overdoses

  • Make sure the scene is safe, and check alertness. Comfort them if they are awake. If they are unconscious, turn them on their side to prevent aspiration (choking on their vomit).
  • Call 9-1-1 or emergency medical services. Call, or have someone else call, even if the person seems not to be experiencing overdose symptoms; never wait to see if the overdose will wear off. Some effects of an overdose don’t present themselves right away.
  • Check for breathing and pulse; If not breathing begin CPR.
  • Remove unnecessary clothing if the situation allows. Some drugs cause the patient to quickly overheat.
  • Find details to aid with treatment. Knowing what drug was taken, how much, when, and by what method is important. If the victim is not awake, look for containers, needles, syringes, and other items.

Don’ts for Drug Overdoses

  • Don’t put the person in the shower. Even if the victim seems okay, a large temperature change could put them in shock.
  • Don’t let the person sleep. Someone who overdosed may pass out, and you will not be able to stop them; however, trying to keep them awake makes it easier to monitor their condition.
  • Don’t attempt to make them throw up if they took the drugs orally. This can increase the chance of aspiration.
  • Don’t wait for the drug to wear off. Call for emergency medical services immediately.
  • Don’t try to feed the victim. Some foods can have adverse effects.
  • Don’t leave the victim alone. Stay with them, monitor their condition, and provide help as needed.
  • Don’t try to reason with or restrain a violent person or put yourself in an unsafe position.

First Aid for Known Opioid Overdose

Examples of opioids include morphine, codeine, oxycodone, oxycodone with acetaminophen, and hydrocodone with acetaminophen. Because opioids affect the part of the brain that controls breathing, too high of opioid levels in the blood can slow breathing down to dangerous levels, which could cause death.

For victims with a suspected or known opioid overdose who have a definite pulse but no normal breathing or only gasping (respiratory arrest) in addition to providing standard care, it is reasonable for trained rescuers—this includes first aid providers, non-healthcare providers, or BLS providers—to administer Narcan® (naloxone) intramuscularly or intranasally to victims with an opioid-associated respiratory emergency.

Victims with no definite pulse may be in cardiac arrest or they may have an undetected slow or weak pulse. These cases should be managed as a cardiac arrest victim.

Standard resuscitation should take priority over the administration of naloxone, with a focus on high-quality CPR. It may be reasonable to administer naloxone—especially when an opioid overdose is suspected—based on the possibility that the victim is in respiratory arrest, not cardiac.

Opioid-Associated Life-Threatening Emergency (Adult) Algorithm

  • Assess and activate. Check for unresponsiveness and call for nearby help. Send someone to call 9-1-1 and get AED and naloxone. Observe for breathing versus no breathing or only gasping.
  • Begin CPR. If the victim is unresponsive with no breathing or only gasping, begin CPR (CPR technique based on the rescuer’s level of training). If alone, perform CPR for about 2 minutes before leaving to phone 9-1-1 and get naloxone and an AED.
  • Administer naloxone. Give naloxone as soon as it is available. 2 mg intranasal or 0.4 mg intramuscular. May repeat after 4 minutes.
  • Does the person respond? If yes, stimulate and reassess. Continue to check responsiveness and breathing until advanced help arrives. If the person stops responding, begin CPR and repeat naloxone. If no response, continue CPR and use an AED as soon as it is available. Continue until the person responds or until advanced help arrives.

First Aid for Self-Harm or Self-Cutting

Because self-harm, also known as self-injury or self-cutting, involves physical injury, it can seem like self-harm and suicide are directly related. For example, it is common to think that cutting one’s wrist may be a suicidal gesture indicating that the person wishes to slit their wrists to die.

Self-injury can indicate a number of different things. Many people who practice self-injury may not intend to kill themselves and may even see self-harm as a way of avoiding suicide. It is crucial to note that with the pattern of self-injury occurring over weeks, months, or years, the person may be at risk for suicide.

Here’s what you should do if you a self-harm situation presents to you:

  • Make sure the scene is safe, and assess and activate. Assess the victim’s responsiveness. Call or have someone else call 9-1-1 or emergency services.
  • Locate and control the bleed. Arterial blood is bright red and spurts or sprays from the wound. If the blood is darker in color and easier to control, it means that the veins have been cut, and the artery was missed.
  • Apply direct, firm pressure. Apply a towel or dressing directly to the wound.
  • Elevate. Position the wounded limb in a position where it’s above the victim’s heart.
  • Occlude or pinch an artery above the injury. If possible apply pressure to an artery to halt the blood supply to that limb. If the bleeding does not stop after direct pressure, a tourniquet may be needed.
  • Assuming the bleeding has stopped, continue to assess the victim—circulation, airway, and breathing. Follow the Basic Life Support (BLS) Algorithm.

If You Know Someone in Crisis:

Call the toll-free National Suicide Prevention Lifeline (NSPL) at 1–800–273–TALK (8255), 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. The service is available to everyone. The deaf and hard of hearing can contact the Lifeline via TTY at 1–800–799–4889. All calls are confidential.

Washington State Crime Victim Service Center Hotline: 888.288.9221

Contact social media outlets directly if you are concerned about a friend’s social media updates or dial 911 in an emergency.

Learn more on the NSPL’s website. The Crisis Text Line is another resource available 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. Text “HOME” to 741741.

Remote Mental Health Services

Remote Mental Health Services

Virtual Wellness Practitioners

In the time of COVID-19, we need access to quality therapists, coaches, and specialists now more than ever.  PDX Local has assembled a guide of Portland area service providers for mental health and holistic/physical health offering consultations by video and phone. If you have additional practitioners you would like to suggest, please contact us.

Coaches  | Therapists  | Other Service Providers

Can’t Wait? Visit the Crisis Resources page.

Therapists

Abri Radically Open DBT. Abri, based in Portland, Oregon, is one of the first psychotherapy clinics worldwide to specialize solely in Radically Open DBT for disorders of over-control. Both LiLin and Kirsten are on the RO DBT Senior Clinician team and are approved RO DBT trainers. They are enthusiastic practitioners of RO DBT, stay current with the research and have an active consultation team with other senior clinicians in the Northwest. Their mission is to provide excellent full-fidelity treatment in a lovely and inviting setting. (503) 386-1515

Connective Therapy Collective. Committed to intersectional, trauma-informed,
pleasure-centered clinical work in sex and gender. (971) 361-8303

The Counseling Umbrella. We are a mental health counseling private practice, committed to helping clients & our community engage around mental health issues. Masters in Professional Mental Health Counseling, Social Work.  (503) 473-1600 

Emerging Path Counseling, LLC. Mental Health counseling, general practice as well as specializing in trauma and anxiety. Stephanie Garneaux is a Licensed Professional Counselor, Certified Alcohol and Drug Counselor III, and a Certified Clinical Trauma Professional. She has worked in behavioral health for over 10 years, and as a Qualified Mental Health Professional since 2014. Stephanie has a Masters Degree in Community Mental Health Counseling. (971) 291-0579

Family Roots Therapy. Family Roots Therapy is a counseling practice in Portland, Oregon focused specifically on the unique mental health needs of new parents and young children. (503) 746-3373 

Kirgin Consulting. I am a Jungian psychologist and business/leadership consultant. I am working virtually with individuals, couples, leaders at this time. Contact Online

Marchick Counseling and Consulting. My philosophy is that in every stage in life there is an opportunity for personal growth and acceptance of self. Together we will evaluate the options available to you, discuss how to navigate family dynamics, create appropriate plans and strategies, and learn about self-care. Exploring and establishing healthy habits can help one find balance and feel success. (503) 683-3179

MindTree. I am a licensed child and family therapist primarily working with children ( 4 plus) and women. Currently offer virtual sessions! (503) 766-4895 

Rachael A Ringwood. Specializes in mood disorders such as depression, anxiety and bipolar conditions. (385) 203-7622 

Root and Bloom Counseling. Specializing in Holistic, Inclusive Pregnancy and Postpartum Counseling, Including Depression, Anxiety, Traumatic Births, Grief, and Loss. (503) 905-9839

Sarah Hart, Psychotherapy. My approach is dynamic & collaborative. I work from a culturally-informed, inclusive model & incorporate all aspects of an individual’s identity/experiences into treatment. My specialties include anxiety, depression, identity, Autism & relationships. (503) 967-9767

Urban Counseling Collective. We are open to new telehealth intakes for anyone that is wanting to begin psychological services or anyone needing additional support during this time of social distancing. 503-610-2044

Coaches

Alignment and Alchemy. Hi, I’m Sarah, and I help women reconnect with their authentic selves and achieve greater health and happiness through movement, mindfulness, and mindset. Contact online

Apothic Energy. Working from a place of love and genuine desire for all to have well being, Apothic Energy utilizes old and new energy medicine techniques to bring people into a true sense of health. Contact online

Alyssa Rose Healing Arts. My focus and passion rests with end of life care and working with grief. I find Craniosacral Therapy and unwinding to be extremely beneficial for people at this stage of life, and love this work. I also practice massage (relaxation, wellness, MVA’s, myofascial, and deep tissue). (503) 345-0530

Beatriz Reyna. Inner child work/shadow work/journeys into your inner world.

Beloved Coaching. I am a Sex and Intimacy Coach who has completed Advanced Training in the Somatica® Method. My heart’s work is to help people explore, deshamify, and celebrate their unique sexual selves. (971) 238-8131

Bipolar Life Coaching. Wellness and life coaching for persons living with mood disorders and their loved ones. Contact Online

Coach Woida. Certified life coach specializing in mental health, building confidence and emotional intelligence. (802) 498-5062 

The Courage Practice. The Courage Practice is offering FREE intuitive 1:1 coaching sessions via Zoom throughout April. Please share the love with someone you love. We are here for you and your community, friends. Contact online

Emanating Medicine. 1:1 coaching for emotional/trauma/shadow integration sessions. Contact online

Grief Warrior. I hope to soften the armor of grief by validating the pain and witnessing the emotion. Together, let’s make sure that the grieving know they are not alone. (800) 901-4617

Grounded Alignment. The Grounded Alignment work incorporates tools and practices from several disciplines, including guided breathing/visualization exercises, writing and daily practices. Contact online

Enhance Your Life. I work with heart-centered healers & women in business to create their ideal life. With over 30 years experience, Jan is a Transformational Coach, whose background includes: Tapping Into Wealth coach program, Naturopathic Physician (ret) instructor/speaker, hypnotherapist, and behavior therapy. (503) 593-3360

HealingWaze. Holistic Health Directory.

Inner Skye Counseling. Our inner world is multi-faceted, like the terrain of the Sky(e). I am honored and inspired to join you in navigating your inner landscapes. Now offering telehealth therapy sessions. (971) 361-8861 

Julia Phoenix. Relationship coach, speaker and transformational healer. Email questions. Contact online

Julie Papcup. Personal coaching and tapping. Contact online

Lauren Drake Coaching. I help women live in alignment with their soul callings, so they can find more peace, ease, and wealth. Contact online

Lenore Hypnosis. I do a lot of work with confidence and helping people gain control over feelings of anxiety, fear, and insecurity. (425) 985-7916 

Light Heart Society. Holistic life coaching for creatives. Contact online

MCHealth Life Coach. I have a private Health & Life Coach practice where I specialize in transformational habit change, being an advocate for living healthy, and an accountability partner to keep you striving to reach your ultimate goals. Contact online

Myrissa Otterbein-Pyle. 1:1 Lifestyle coaching. Psychedelic consultations and integration. Contact online

The Nature In You. Katrina Nilsson-Gorman, is a certified Nature and Forest Therapy Guide and Intuitive Healer. She holds certifications with The Association of Nature and Forest Therapy, the Tree of Totems Spiritual Wilderness School as an Ayu-Shamanic Practitioner, and a Bachelor of Arts from The University of Puget Sound in Music and English. (970) 556-4562

Nurture Life Coaching. Certified Life Coach & Licensed Massage Therapist, Focusing on Women and LGTBQ Individuals. Cultivating your inner clarity for positive change. (503) 473-4754

Rachel Li Coach. Rachel works with leaders to offer soulful solutions to the disquiet spoiling the workplace. If you are tired from too much screen staring and from having partially present dialogues come recharge with some deep healing. Contact online

Soul Talk Coaching. Phone support for LGBTQIA + Individuals, couples, and families, help with anxiety, depression, dating, relationships, family, career, financial worries, spiritual growth, and much more. Contact online

Stella Harris. I’m a certified intimacy educator and professional coach. In addition to my direct work with clients and students, I work with professionals such as therapists and educators in the hopes of putting myself out of a job. (503) 568-1275

The Vital Spirit. I am an empath, spiritual teacher, and intuitive healer living in Portland, Oregon. I created The Vital Spirit to be an instrument in the ongoing shift in human consciousness. I serve empaths and lightworkers through intuitive energy alignment and strategic business consulting. I align my clients with their true nature and their spirit-led businesses. (503) 784-3119

Sophia Treyger. Sophia is a Relationship & Intimacy Coach, and owner of Radical Pleasurist, teaching the global community how to have meaningful and deeply connected relationships through embodiment, courageous communication, and the creation of genuine agreements without needing to be a people-pleaser. Radical Pleasurist shifts people from pleaser to pleasure. Contact Online

Other Providers

Arbor Vitae. Massage & Somatic Therapies for every body, mind and spirit. Tap into the root of health at ARBOR VITAE. (503) 367-7659

Aurora Remember. My mission is to help Highly Excitable people use their fire without getting burned by connecting with their powers, balance their energy and feel a sense of accomplishment in their life. Contact Online

The Brain Breakthrough. Unlocking Your Brain’s Potential! Breakthrough anxiety, trauma, reading struggles, and concussions! (971) 231-5214

The Bodhi Tree. Dr. Sage Dillon The Bodhi Tree offering exercise, rehab, nutritional counseling, exams for new or old musculoskeletal injuries and referrals to imaging. I am also able to answer questions if somenone is unclear if they need to go to ED. Insurance is accepted for telehealth if you are in OR. (503) 331-1800

Dovetail College Counseling.  Amy Romm Lockard is a dedicated college admissions expert and founder of Dovetail College Consulting. M.S.Ed. (609) 706-6492

Fit Body Boot Camp. Online coaching with our members until we can open up again! Contact Online

Flying Squirrel Consulting Partners, LLC. I am offering discounted virtual business coaching: survival and recovery strategy. Flying Squirrel provides flexible support services for motivated business owners who are seeking mentoring, coaching, & experienced perspective. (503) 926-3601

Ikigai Wellness. Walking along in your journey of life, you’ve come across physical trauma, difficulties and stressors that have affected you in many ways. Your health is the foundation you walk on, a wholistic environment comprised of your physical, mental-emotional and spiritual well-being. My purpose is to assist you with reducing your pain naturally, finding your balance and returning to the activities you love. (503) 308-8676

Kirin Bhatti. Earth-Based Healing+Strategy Guided By The Rhythms Of The Seasons And Our Bodies. For The Change-Makers, Leaders And Healers Who Are Hungry To Resurrect Ancient Blueprints On How To Lead And Live Naturally. Email

New // Narratives. Robin Carlisle is a Multidisciplinary Healing Arts Practitioner, working with a wide range of therapeutic modalities from Cognitive Behavioral Therapy to Mindfulness, as well as variety of Somatic practices. (503) 457-2749

Prenatal and Postpartum Online Resources. An online spreadsheet of area providers offering virtual services.

Radical Wellbeing Body Work. Licensed Massage Therapist. Movement Teacher. Medicinal Poet. Priestess of the New Paradigm. (503) 662-2490

The Raw & Wild Hearts. Virtual wellness consultations and hypnotherapy sessions. Contact Online

Sol Food Nutrition. Iris Briand, RDN. Customized nutrition coaching. 541.908.0632

Tara Jade Nichols. Star Alchemy ~ a seemingly magical process of turning one’s life into gold. Astrology readings allow for discovery of your Soul’s contract, blessings, and challenges. This insight can lead to significant personal growth. Contact online

Disclaimer: This article is not intended to give health or fitness advice. Exercise at your own risk. Consult your doctor or another health professional if you are unsure whether a service or form of therapy is safe for you to use. All opinions expressed are those solely of the PDX Local blog, and do not represent its sponsors, affiliates, or guest contributors. No paid advertising or paid endorsements have been provided for the products featured above. The reviewer makes no claims regarding the efficacy, workmanship, utility, or safety of any of the products listed above. 

Who Is Molly Muriel?

Who Is Molly Muriel?

Interview with apothecary Branda Tiffany.

Who is Molly Muriel? What inspired you to choose that name?

The name Molly Muriel was inspired by my dog. That was her name, and she was my biggest inspiration when I started this company. She was just a pup back in 2002, and sadly left this Earth last year, at almost 16 years of age. So she had a very long and happy life. Her legacy lives on with this business, and she is still a great inspiration.
 
I read your story on the website. Can you tell us more about the journey from a candle making class to your own line of vegan soaps, balms, and cosmetics?
After spending a good year trying every kind of candle I could find info on, I wanted to branch out. I’m not sure why soap was my goal, but I quickly dove in and tried my first batch. Back then there wasn’t so much information online like we can find now, so I was reading books on fixed oils, fragrances, colorants, and pretty much tried them all. I truly feel that not being able to access so many recipes and info gave me a huge advantage of completely understanding the process of formulation and saponification from the ground up. Through many mistakes and troubleshooting came the beginnings of the product line that exists today.
 
What does being vegan mean to you? Do you personally practice a vegan lifestyle?
I’m not one to love labels, i.e. vegan, vegetarian, etc. I live my life more from a conscientious standpoint. I’m a clean eater, avoiding processed and chemical derived foods. As for environment, I try to avoid plastic when possible, and use as many recycled goods as possible. Veganism is such an individual thing and can mean different things to many people. Being a lover of animals, I do what I can to respect them in all of my life choices, including the food I eat, the clothes I choose to wear, and the goods I purchase.
 
Molly Muriel Lip Balm - PDX LocalWhat goes into your testing and product development process?
My process begins with research and development. I do a lot of investigation on ingredients I want to implement. I read about their nourishing attributes, as well as potential allergens or irritants. I also dive deep into sourcing to make sure that the ingredient that reaches me is the best quality. As for testing, my friends and family are usually my best test subjects. They give me honest feedback about scent, function, reactions, or anything else that may pertain. I’m so thankful to be surrounded by great people who will take the time to try some of my creations.
 
What are some of the challenges of marketing, manufacturing, and distributing an independent, plant-based brand in a crowded global marketplace?
Marketing is a huge part of business, it has the largest impact on getting my brand out there. It also happens to be my least favorite part of running a small business. But I’ve found that it’s very necessary to have a great marketing strategy or you won’t get the information about your products to the people that are looking for it. I’ve done everything from trade shows  and cold calling to emailing and visiting potential stores in person to try to connect. It’s a lot of work, but can also be very rewarding. Manufacturing can be challenging as well, as I’ve gotten to points where I’ve had to purchase ingredients in larger quantities and make bigger batches, there’s always a learning curve with each step forward. I still go through that now, 16 years in! As for distribution, I’ve realized that my industry, natural beauty/body care, has been on the rise and will just keep going, so I don’t try to compete with large companies. I have a vey different product that will appeal to those folks that seek natural and healthy lifestyles. I do what I can and figure that beyond that the products will speak for themselves, and so far they have.
 
What are some gifts you would recommend for vegans? (These can be from your store, but they don’t have to be.)
Of course I would suggest anything from my product line. However, one of our lines stands out for vegans. It can be very difficult to find vegan lip balm, most is made with bees wax. We use candelilla wax and floral wax instead, which is so very nourishing to chronically chapped lips. My favorite is the lavender mint. Outside of my product line, I really love Queen Bee products using vinyl instead of leather. They also have a 25% discount buy-back program that rocks! Also, a gift certificate to Blossoming Lotus or Sweetpea Baking Company would be excellent, two of my favorites! Yum!!
 
What is the most popular item / product among your customers?
Our bar soaps have always been great sellers, specifically the Volcanic Bliss bar. I can’t seem to keep that one in stock. During the winter months we sell a lot of candles, the Spice It Up being a big hit, it has cinnamon and clove essential oils and is warm and spicy during those winter months.

This isn’t a question but I have to say that as someone with perennially chapped lips, your lip balm is truly the best thing I have ever tried. Better than all the national brands. Thank you.

Founder Branda Tiffany - PDX Local

Founder Branda Tiffany

Well, thank you! I find the same thing to be true. I had chronically chapped lips for years and did research to formulate this product for myself. The mimosa floral wax I use helps not only to heal tissue, but is a great protectant against the elements. I’m sure that’s why it has been so great for me 🙂 I’m so glad that you’re experiencing the same thing!!
 
You’ve been in business since 2002. Any advice for aspiring entrepreneurs?
I would say, put your focus on feeding your soul before your bank account, and this can be a very sustainable venture for you in the long run. Of course we have to be practical, but true happiness comes from choosing to do something that we love and the money will follow. Don’t give up, just keep your eyes and ears open, and listen to others’ advice, whether you take it or not. One of the worst things we can do is to be stubborn and let our ego get in our way. If we move that aside we can be very successful in all the ways that matter.
 
 
Molly Muriel
Online shop: www.mollymuriel.com
Retail location at: www.milwaukiemercantile.com
Bipolar Awareness

Bipolar Awareness

Today is National Bipolar Awareness Day

Education is key.

March 30, 2020

Some things you should know about me: I am Bipolar Type I. I had my driver’s license taken away by the state of Massachusetts without cause in May 2016; that was why I moved to Oregon. I figured it was someplace I could get a job and be financially independent whether or not I was able to get my license back. (And yes, I did get it back by the way.)

I have always considered myself a success story. A poster child for treatment and medication. And I’ve been able to achieve a lot in the past 20 years since diagnosis.

A friend who suffers from anxiety and depression told me, “I  figured you had all of the same problems as me, only worse.”

No, not really. I don’t have a personality disorder. I never really had any serious issues with trauma until a year and a half ago.

One in 23 Americans experience bipolar at some point in their lives. Many bipolar people experience no symptoms at all with medication. They are able to go back to normal life.  Most people with bipolar disorder are closeted, and that is because the stigma is so bad. We are always at risk for gaslighting. Many people will not willingly associate with us. Yet I have close friends, clients, and professional colleagues that knew me for years before I ever told them my diagnosis. They said they said they never would have guessed.

I happen to believe that stigma, even more than the disease, is why our death rate is so high. How high? About 15% over a lifetime. To put that in perspective, annualized over the first 50 years after diagnosis, the risk of suicide if you are bipolar is about one third as high as the risk of dying from COVID-19. They are comparable.

The bipolar death rate is probably quite a bit higher in actuality, as many suicides are not reported as such and because the disease strikes people most commonly in their teens and twenties. I am told that if you can make it past middle age, symptoms decrease, particularly for women. This has proved true for my mother, who is also bipolar.

For me a lot seems to do with having access to the right formulation of Lithium (brand name vs. generic).  Switching to brand name Lithium (Lithane) worked wonders for me, probably because the quality control and dosage standards are much higher. The catch is that this formulation is at present only available in Canada. I am working with a Vancouver local to get my prescription picked up and shipped to the U.S.A. Wish me luck.

What is it like to have a manic episode? It’s hard to describe. A mild manic episode is disorienting and disabling — you can’t really work except for simple tasks like housework or cleaning. Inhibitions are lowered. You might do things you would do if you were drunk, like have a fling with someone or buy stuff you don’t need on Amazon.

A full-blown psychotic manic episode is very different. It’s more like a hallucinogenic drug trip — and we’re not talking microdoses. It puts you in a different reality. For example, I might wander outside my house and onto the bridge nearby, not really knowing what I am doing or where I am. I might get on a bus and just ride for half an hour.

There is a mystical component. You feel like you are at one with the universe. Music sounds amazing. Colors and tastes are more more intense. Some bipolar people enjoy the “high.” I have never sought it out. For that matter, I’ve never tried any drug stronger than pot. It’s not that I’m not curious. Just too risky with my brain chemistry.

For me, mania has always been highly correlated with insomnia and sleep disruption. Psychotic mania can be treated successfully at home, if you have the right drugs. The safest option is probably to go inpatient.

Not much happens in a mental hospital. There are no miracle drugs or aggressive treatments. You just take your Perphenazine and mill about in a safe place where you can’t do (much) damage to yourself or others, eat bad food, try to focus your concentration enough to play a card game or read a few pages out of a book, and wait until someone decides you’re well enough to go home.

To be honest, it feels a lot like… now.

Like the Coronavirus Lockdown.

The same boredom. The same impatience. For those who have never been through something like this before, the only advice I can give is to try to keep yourself occupied, and try to be courteous and respectful to the people around you. This too shall pass.

 


 

For more resources, articles, and advice on living with bipolar and being present for the bipolar people in your life, visit my Quora page.

Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, I have scaled back my coaching practice considerably. I have a limited number of phone and video entrepreneurial and coaching slots available. Full professional resume and credentials available on request.