World Insane Is The Overloaded Brain

World Insane Is The Overloaded Brain

Freestyle verse by Sincere God Magnetic

We’re already socially distant. The pandemic is reaction to the systemic distortion of academics. 5G is radioactive pollution while the body succumbs to inner confusion designed and spread by mass media controlled execution. Mistrust is a must in a world built on ashes to ashes, dust to dust. The meek won’t inherit the earth as stock markets crash and cryptocurrency gains its worth. All in all as hysteria rises the unseen government builds firewalls to prevent a scenario that ends in total recall and catastrophic downfall. The love frequency has been corrupted by mental meltdown and deviant delinquency. Stay aware and resilient, maintain your militant stance, we’ve been infiltrated by reptilians. Tomorrow never knows but today the heat signature in the atmosphere grows causing an unprecedented increase in the force of tidal flows. We must dwell and excel together as we have crossed the threshold into the new forever.

Who Is Molly Muriel?

Who Is Molly Muriel?

Interview with apothecary Branda Tiffany.

Who is Molly Muriel? What inspired you to choose that name?

The name Molly Muriel was inspired by my dog. That was her name, and she was my biggest inspiration when I started this company. She was just a pup back in 2002, and sadly left this Earth last year, at almost 16 years of age. So she had a very long and happy life. Her legacy lives on with this business, and she is still a great inspiration.
 
I read your story on the website. Can you tell us more about the journey from a candle making class to your own line of vegan soaps, balms, and cosmetics?
After spending a good year trying every kind of candle I could find info on, I wanted to branch out. I’m not sure why soap was my goal, but I quickly dove in and tried my first batch. Back then there wasn’t so much information online like we can find now, so I was reading books on fixed oils, fragrances, colorants, and pretty much tried them all. I truly feel that not being able to access so many recipes and info gave me a huge advantage of completely understanding the process of formulation and saponification from the ground up. Through many mistakes and troubleshooting came the beginnings of the product line that exists today.
 
What does being vegan mean to you? Do you personally practice a vegan lifestyle?
I’m not one to love labels, i.e. vegan, vegetarian, etc. I live my life more from a conscientious standpoint. I’m a clean eater, avoiding processed and chemical derived foods. As for environment, I try to avoid plastic when possible, and use as many recycled goods as possible. Veganism is such an individual thing and can mean different things to many people. Being a lover of animals, I do what I can to respect them in all of my life choices, including the food I eat, the clothes I choose to wear, and the goods I purchase.
 
Molly Muriel Lip Balm - PDX LocalWhat goes into your testing and product development process?
My process begins with research and development. I do a lot of investigation on ingredients I want to implement. I read about their nourishing attributes, as well as potential allergens or irritants. I also dive deep into sourcing to make sure that the ingredient that reaches me is the best quality. As for testing, my friends and family are usually my best test subjects. They give me honest feedback about scent, function, reactions, or anything else that may pertain. I’m so thankful to be surrounded by great people who will take the time to try some of my creations.
 
What are some of the challenges of marketing, manufacturing, and distributing an independent, plant-based brand in a crowded global marketplace?
Marketing is a huge part of business, it has the largest impact on getting my brand out there. It also happens to be my least favorite part of running a small business. But I’ve found that it’s very necessary to have a great marketing strategy or you won’t get the information about your products to the people that are looking for it. I’ve done everything from trade shows  and cold calling to emailing and visiting potential stores in person to try to connect. It’s a lot of work, but can also be very rewarding. Manufacturing can be challenging as well, as I’ve gotten to points where I’ve had to purchase ingredients in larger quantities and make bigger batches, there’s always a learning curve with each step forward. I still go through that now, 16 years in! As for distribution, I’ve realized that my industry, natural beauty/body care, has been on the rise and will just keep going, so I don’t try to compete with large companies. I have a vey different product that will appeal to those folks that seek natural and healthy lifestyles. I do what I can and figure that beyond that the products will speak for themselves, and so far they have.
 
What are some gifts you would recommend for vegans? (These can be from your store, but they don’t have to be.)
Of course I would suggest anything from my product line. However, one of our lines stands out for vegans. It can be very difficult to find vegan lip balm, most is made with bees wax. We use candelilla wax and floral wax instead, which is so very nourishing to chronically chapped lips. My favorite is the lavender mint. Outside of my product line, I really love Queen Bee products using vinyl instead of leather. They also have a 25% discount buy-back program that rocks! Also, a gift certificate to Blossoming Lotus or Sweetpea Baking Company would be excellent, two of my favorites! Yum!!
 
What is the most popular item / product among your customers?
Our bar soaps have always been great sellers, specifically the Volcanic Bliss bar. I can’t seem to keep that one in stock. During the winter months we sell a lot of candles, the Spice It Up being a big hit, it has cinnamon and clove essential oils and is warm and spicy during those winter months.

This isn’t a question but I have to say that as someone with perennially chapped lips, your lip balm is truly the best thing I have ever tried. Better than all the national brands. Thank you.

Founder Branda Tiffany - PDX Local

Founder Branda Tiffany

Well, thank you! I find the same thing to be true. I had chronically chapped lips for years and did research to formulate this product for myself. The mimosa floral wax I use helps not only to heal tissue, but is a great protectant against the elements. I’m sure that’s why it has been so great for me 🙂 I’m so glad that you’re experiencing the same thing!!
 
You’ve been in business since 2002. Any advice for aspiring entrepreneurs?
I would say, put your focus on feeding your soul before your bank account, and this can be a very sustainable venture for you in the long run. Of course we have to be practical, but true happiness comes from choosing to do something that we love and the money will follow. Don’t give up, just keep your eyes and ears open, and listen to others’ advice, whether you take it or not. One of the worst things we can do is to be stubborn and let our ego get in our way. If we move that aside we can be very successful in all the ways that matter.
 
 
Molly Muriel
Online shop: www.mollymuriel.com
Retail location at: www.milwaukiemercantile.com
Bipolar Awareness

Bipolar Awareness

Today is National Bipolar Awareness Day

Education is key.

March 30, 2020

Some things you should know about me: I am Bipolar Type I. I had my driver’s license taken away by the state of Massachusetts without cause in May 2016; that was why I moved to Oregon. I figured it was someplace I could get a job and be financially independent whether or not I was able to get my license back. (And yes, I did get it back by the way.)

I have always considered myself a success story. A poster child for treatment and medication. And I’ve been able to achieve a lot in the past 20 years since diagnosis.

A friend who suffers from anxiety and depression told me, “I  figured you had all of the same problems as me, only worse.”

No, not really. I don’t have a personality disorder. I never really had any serious issues with trauma until a year and a half ago.

One in 23 Americans experience bipolar at some point in their lives. Many bipolar people experience no symptoms at all with medication. They are able to go back to normal life.  Most people with bipolar disorder are closeted, and that is because the stigma is so bad. We are always at risk for gaslighting. Many people will not willingly associate with us. Yet I have close friends, clients, and professional colleagues that knew me for years before I ever told them my diagnosis. They said they said they never would have guessed.

I happen to believe that stigma, even more than the disease, is why our death rate is so high. How high? About 15% over a lifetime. To put that in perspective, annualized over the first 50 years after diagnosis, the risk of suicide if you are bipolar is about one third as high as the risk of dying from COVID-19. They are comparable.

The bipolar death rate is probably quite a bit higher in actuality, as many suicides are not reported as such and because the disease strikes people most commonly in their teens and twenties. I am told that if you can make it past middle age, symptoms decrease, particularly for women. This has proved true for my mother, who is also bipolar.

For me a lot seems to do with having access to the right formulation of Lithium (brand name vs. generic).  Switching to brand name Lithium (Lithane) worked wonders for me, probably because the quality control and dosage standards are much higher. The catch is that this formulation is at present only available in Canada. I am working with a Vancouver local to get my prescription picked up and shipped to the U.S.A. Wish me luck.

What is it like to have a manic episode? It’s hard to describe. A mild manic episode is disorienting and disabling — you can’t really work except for simple tasks like housework or cleaning. Inhibitions are lowered. You might do things you would do if you were drunk, like have a fling with someone or buy stuff you don’t need on Amazon.

A full-blown psychotic manic episode is very different. It’s more like a hallucinogenic drug trip — and we’re not talking microdoses. It puts you in a different reality. For example, I might wander outside my house and onto the bridge nearby, not really knowing what I am doing or where I am. I might get on a bus and just ride for half an hour.

There is a mystical component. You feel like you are at one with the universe. Music sounds amazing. Colors and tastes are more more intense. Some bipolar people enjoy the “high.” I have never sought it out. For that matter, I’ve never tried any drug stronger than pot. It’s not that I’m not curious. Just too risky with my brain chemistry.

For me, mania has always been highly correlated with insomnia and sleep disruption. Psychotic mania can be treated successfully at home, if you have the right drugs. The safest option is probably to go inpatient.

Not much happens in a mental hospital. There are no miracle drugs or aggressive treatments. You just take your Perphenazine and mill about in a safe place where you can’t do (much) damage to yourself or others, eat bad food, try to focus your concentration enough to play a card game or read a few pages out of a book, and wait until someone decides you’re well enough to go home.

To be honest, it feels a lot like… now.

Like the Coronavirus Lockdown.

The same boredom. The same impatience. For those who have never been through something like this before, the only advice I can give is to try to keep yourself occupied, and try to be courteous and respectful to the people around you. This too shall pass.

 


 

For more resources, articles, and advice on living with bipolar and being present for the bipolar people in your life, visit my Quora page.

Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, I have scaled back my coaching practice considerably. I have a limited number of phone and video entrepreneurial and coaching slots available. Full professional resume and credentials available on request.

2020 Wellness Gift Guide

2020 Wellness Gift Guide

Over 50 Great Healthy and Positive Gift Ideas

The PDX Local Wellness Gift Guide celebrates independent, local, and woman-owned businesses while making it really, really easy to beat traffic and do your shopping online. But what exactly qualifies as a “wellness gift?”

Well…

That’s a tricky concept. Maybe you’re thinking it’s anything that doesn’t involve mindless consumption, booze, strippers, or chocolate. Except… we have beer yoga. And pole dancing workout classes. And chocolate, like that made locally right here in Portland by Moonstruck, has been shown to reduce heart disease and promote emotional well-being.

 

For me, wellness means taking care of yourself—and giving others the tools and resources to do the same. I put this list together by asking friends, allies, and colleagues on social media, as well as going with a few old favorites and items from my personal “wish list.” I hope it inspires you to think past the obvious and create wonderful experiences and memories for the year to come.

Here’s to a healthy and productive 2020. Have fun! Shop local.

 

Stand and Deliver

Maybe someone on your list works from home, but their office is a cubbyhole in the corner of the kitchen? Support their goals and dreams with a healthy, ergonomic home office.

 

Jarvis Standing Desk - from Fully Furniture

Jarvis Standing Desk Bamboo Top   Electric Adjustable Height Sit Stand Desk –  by Fully.   Portland, Oregon Local Business   

Swopper Air Motion Chair With Wheels – by Aeris. There are plenty of adjustable ergonomic chairs out there that can be configured to work with standing desks. I’ll be honest. The Swopper is here because it looks the coolest.

 

Anker Wireless Vertical Ergonomic Mouse  I have one of these, and in all honesty it is probably the reason I am still able to type and write today. For those who struggle with repetitive stress injuries (and for those who wish to prevent them!) this inexpensive and elegant wireless mouse is a game changer.

Olander Earthworks makes quirky desktop zen gardens that many therapists and wellness advocates use as a fun anxiety relief tool. So many ways to customize. Portland, Oregon Local Business. 

 

 

Fitness

Seriously. Who doesn’t need a little Lululemon and prAna in their life? But did you know that we have fabulous, fashionable brands of active wear being produced right here in Portland? Check out SXY Athletics. This local, woman-owned line of fitness clothing will keep you motivated to go to the gym. Check out their #BlackFriday Sale. SXY Athletics is a Portland, Oregon Local Business. 

 

Go “Ruck Yourself.” Seriously! Rucking (walking with a weighted backpack) is one of the easiest and safest ways to lose weight over time. If you don’t have a sturdy backpack, you can pick up the weighted kind at goruck.com. For the 80% to 90% who have our own (or our kid’s) Jansport sitting in a closet somewhere, adding weight to a day pack is a great way to try out rucking. I recommend custom rucking weights over hand weights because they are less likely to shift and potentially damage the pack.

 

Comfort and Joy

You know how we always say “practice self care?” Well, sometimes that’s easier to do when somebody else helps out with the little things. The people on your list will know they are cared for with these thoughtful and practical gift ideas.

Full Belly Fare – Do you have a loved one who’s had a new baby, surgery, or other stressor? Although you may not be able to deliver a meal yourself, Full Belly Fare is the perfect gift solution for family and friends who want to provide meaningful support to someone experiencing a life transition or challenge!  Personal chef Lyla prepares hand-crafted meals, including vegan gluten free, dairy free, vegetarian, soy free, and paleo meal options. Use discount code PDXLocal15 for $15 off all first orders (new customers). Portland, Oregon Local Business   


Cassarole – Handmade and vintage items. Only shop features tinctures, body butter, and this extraordinary geode soap. Portland, Oregon Local Business   

Seagrape bath + body is a queer owned natural brand with a focus on artisan crafted goods for self-care. Portland, Oregon Local Business 


Hot Cherry Pit Pillow Square – Red Denim, Natural-Dyed Natural Moist Heat or Cold Therapy for Muscle Pain, Tension Relief, Headaches, Arthritis, Aromatherapy – Microwavable

Mama Tea-a Inspirational hand-blended organic herbal teas. Portland, Oregon Local Business. 

Cherry River CBD

Cherryriver.net. CBD products for Bath, Beauty, and Wellness. They offer gift sets, along with a line of topicals, a sports line, bath bombs, and have just released a high potency tincture. Portland, Oregon Local Business   

Back to Broth.  Organic, local, pasture-raised medicinal bone broth. Portland, Oregon Local Business   

Briar Patch Herbs. Culinary and medicinal herbs. Receive compassionate guidance from an experienced Herbalist. Portland, Oregon Local Business   

Gather Around Nutrition. Johanna is a private therapeutic chef with a Master’s Degree in Holistic Nutrition who does in-home meal prep, custom meal plans and in-home cooking classes. Portland, Oregon Local Business   

Molly Muriel. The best lip balm I have ever found. Even better, it’s vegan! Read our interview with founder and apothecary Branda Tiffany here. Portland, Oregon Local Business   

Optimistic Soap. Optimistic Soap makes unique, handcrafted soap with all-natural ingredients! 20% of all profits are donated to charity. Portland, Oregon Local Business   

Recreating Society self care holistic products and tea. Portland, Oregon Local Business   

Whole Tree CBD. Hand-crafted hemp CBD products that aid in healing of the mind and body. Portland, Oregon Local Business   

Yo Soy Candles  Handcrafted eco-conscious candles. Each beautiful scent is paired with its very own “I AM” statement to inspire a positive mindset + empower transformation by practicing the self loving ritual of I AM. Portland, Oregon Local Business 

Gift Certificates

So many people will tell you that they don’t need more “stuff” in their life. So what is the perfect gift? Consider health and wellness services from a local practitioner. From massage to coaching to astrology, a gift certificate gives someone the opportunity to explore a path that they might never have discovered otherwise.

Anna DeSalvo. “I offer productivity coaching for working moms juggling it all.” Sound like anyone you know? Portland, Oregon Local Business 

Avani Massage. Head and neck pain specialist, online gift certificates available for multiple locations. Portland, Oregon Local Business 

Beaverton Neurofeedback. Brain training for better sleep, memory, attention and more. Portland, Oregon Local Business

Beginning Within – Massage therapy, pelvic floor therapy, newborn therapy. Offering hypnobirthing classes and childbirth consultations, and a range of gift certificates Portland, Oregon Local Business 

The Bodhi Tree Clinic. Gift Certificates for Massage and Chiropractic. Portland, Oregon Local Business 

Body Awareness Massage. Wellness collective, NE Portland. Portland, Oregon Local Business 

Brass Tacks. Strength and nutrition coaching. Portland, Oregon Local Business 

FOXO3 Sauna. Infrared sauna sessions. Portland, Oregon Local Business

Goals with Tracy. Holistic in-home personal training for whole women. Portland, Oregon Local Business 

H.O.P.E. PDX. Ear reflexology, trauma release, reiki, and pranic healing. Portland, Oregon Local Business 

Indigo Healings. Specializing in energy work: Reiki, Access Bars for people and Animal Healings for beloved pets. Intuitive readings are included with the bodywork. Portland, Oregon Local Business 

Jenee Woodlief. Massage gift certificates. Located in NE Portland. Portland, Oregon Local Business 


The Herbal Apothecary: 100 Medicinal Herbs and How to Use Them
by J.J. Pursell  Portland, Oregon Local Author

Love Your Skin Day Spa. Lacey offers organic facials, massage, organic airbrush tans, facial waxing, Microderm, LED and oxygen treatments. Portland, Oregon Local Business 

Marchick Counseling. If you’re a GenXer like me, eldercare is already on your mind, and probably on the minds of other family members as well. Daniella is a licensed therapist and consultant who makes it a little less scary to address this daunting topic. She specializes in caregiving and aging concerns, and offers give gift certificates to interested individuals who want to consult about caregiving. Portland, Oregon Local Business 

Meet at the Spa. Chelsea has massage therapy gift certificates available. Contact her for the most up-to-date-information. Portland, Oregon Local Business 

Pathfinder Wellness Clinic Black Friday offers through Monday 12/2. They have holiday gift certificates available for these packages and for gift packages of any size. Portland, Oregon Local Business 

Pink Moon PDX. Facials, lashes & waxing & dermalogica products. Portland, Oregon Local Business 

PDX Local Coaching. Yes, I offer gift certificates! My coaching practice focuses on entrepreneurial coaching and  wellness coaching for individual with depressive and bipolar disorders. Contact me to find out more. Portland, Oregon Local Business 

Portland Cuddle Shop.  Connection and Cuddle Therapy.  Gift a Connection Session to someone this winter. Hold or be held, think out loud, take a nap, play a game, color, cry, laugh, reminisce. Relax in a judgement free zone with you-centered attention. Portland, Oregon Local Business   

Beatriz ReynaBeatriz Reyna. Inner child work/shadow work/journeys into your inner world.

From Beatriz: “YOU WILL BE SEEN. YOU WILL BE HEARD. YOU WILL BE UNDERSTOOD. YOU WILL BE FELT INTO AND EXPERIENCE ATTUNEMENT. YOU WILL EXPERIENCE THE LOVE AND PRESENCE YOU’VE ALWAYS WANTED.YOU WILL HAVE MAJOR SHIFTS.”

Portland, Oregon Local Business   

Root and Branch Fitness Personal training and integrative fitness. Portland, Oregon Local Business   

Royal Treatment Skin. As a dual licensed Acupuncturist and Aesthetician, Melissa offers a ton of awesome services to help you look and feel your best. Portland, Oregon Local Business 

Sabrina Wright. Massage therapist with gift certificates and massage packages available. Portland, Oregon Local Business 

Showgirl Temple. ShowGirl Temple offers gift cards for Burlesque classes and merch, for some sexy selfcare! Portland, Oregon Local Business   

SkinSense Spa. Debbie offers holistic facials using Naturopathica and ISUN skin care lines that is organic, vegan and gluten free and wildcraft. Holistic facials for tweens, teens and adults specifically with acne, also pregnant mamas and clients recovering from skin cancer. She also offers Intraceuticals Oxygen facials to target aging and preventing fine lines and wrinkles and Cryoskin treatments to slim and tone for facials. Black Friday Special: use promo code BF20%

Sofia Angelina Photography. Sofia offers healing portrait sessions, in which she combines energy healing and portrait photography for folks who are looking to celebrate themselves and embrace their bodies with empathy. Portland, Oregon Local Business   

Whole Being Massage. We have massage gift certificates and also sell some very nice aromatherapy oils and self-care tools that make great gifts! We can do couples/friend massages, prenatal, new mama massages, and more We are in inner SE PDX. Portland, Oregon Local Business   

Therapia Wellness Clinic.  Massage, chiropractic and acupuncture gift certificates available. Portland, Oregon Local Business   

Disclaimer: This article is not intended to give health or fitness advice. Exercise at your own risk. Consult your doctor or another health professional if you are unsure whether a product or form of exercise is safe for you to use. All opinions expressed are those solely of the PDX Local blog, and do not represent its sponsors, affiliates, or guest contributors. No paid advertising or paid endorsements have been provided for the products featured above. The reviewer makes no claims regarding the efficacy, workmanship, utility, or safety of any of the products listed above. As an Amazon Associate I earn from qualifying purchases. Use and purchase at your own risk.

Keep On Trucking

Keep On Trucking

Illustrator and puppeteer Geahk Burchill is homeless. That hasn’t stopped him from telling his story. A Portland resident for 18 years, and local to the St. John’s neighborhood since 2005, he spoke with us about his experiences and shared his newest project, a webcomic called Trucked Up.

 

How long have you been in Portland, Oregon? 

I first moved to Portland, from Oakland, California, in May 2001 because of a sun allergy. I made the decision after getting a bad sunburn that February and felt like I could choose a place less difficult for me. I loved Portland instantly but didn’t have much savings. A minor fender-bender drained what saving I had and I spent a few months living in my VW van. Fortunately, I got work as a carpenter, and an apartment, relatively quickly. I had no idea it wouldn’t be the last time I was homeless.

Dr. Hadrian in his Library. (Photo: David Emmite) - PDX Local

Dr. Hadrian in his Library. (Photo: David Emmite)

I moved to St. Johns in 2005 after starting a marionette company. I worked days for Michael Curry Design, and nights on my own puppets, building up a small theater company. In 2010 I left Curry to start my own design/build business and did reasonably well until about 2013 when I received less and less work. By 2014 I had a personal unraveling after working very long hours and losing money on multiple jobs. I let go of my house, first, and lived in my studio; in late 2017 I lost the studio as well. I converted the old puppet-truck into a live/work space and put everything in storage.

 

Describe your current living situation.

Oakland, where Burchill grew up. -- PDX Local

Oakland, where Burchill grew up.

I live in a decommissioned bread truck in which I built a bed, a kitchen, and work space. I took all the tools which used to make up my studio and made a condensed wood shop to try and continue getting work. For a long time I was parking on the street, moving the truck constantly, from spot to spot, to avoid cops. It made jobs difficult and I delivered projects late. That made it harder to get further work. It was also deeply demoralizing.The body of the truck is aluminum. In the summer it’s an oven inside, and a freezer now that it’s winter. In October the truck broke down and I had to have it towed. It’s now parked in the side yard of a friend, whom I pay to use utilities. Even at the amount he’s charging, I’m often late paying. It’s still a very unstable situation. I’m looking forward to repairing the truck, if I can, and having a bit more control over my life again.

 

Would you describe yourself as homeless? 

I’m not sleeping rough. I’ve made my space as comfortable as I can. I have my cat, who sleeps on a heating pad, and my art desk, which I built to perfectly suit me. I have a microwave, and toaster oven, to make hot meals; an electric kettle for coffee. It’s about as cozy as homelessness can get but there’s a lot of room for improvement. It leaks in places. It was unsafe at times. Someone cut my gas line and stole fuel in the middle of one night while I was inside. It’s old and unreliable. At the same time, it represents a certain amount of freedom. I like the space despite its problems. I can see myself driving to jobs in the future and working out of the back.

 

Panel from "Trucked Up" - PDX Local

 

Your artistic style for the panels of “Trucked Up” is amazing. What is your process, and what tools do you use?

I started with traditional materials. I grew up poor and my medium was usually pen on copy paper. Five simple supplies. Paper, a good pen, a blue pencil, an eraser and a ruler. Later I began drawing with nib-pen on translucent vellum with India ink. That allowed me to sketch on cheap paper and then trace onto the expensive vellum with the nice dip pen for really crisp results.

I currently can’t do anything very messy in the truck, but I did an ad project a few months ago which earned me enough money to buy an iPad with Apple Pencil. I then recreated the way the vellum and dip-pen work in an app called Procreate. It allows me to be very portable and draw in cafes, where I can get wifi access.

Unfortunately, I bought the iPad just before the truck broke down. For a while I was kicking myself. It was a lot of money, but as I’ve kept drawing, I feel it was the only choice to keep me motivated and focused on the future. It’s become the tool I use for everything, including this comic I’ve started. I’m learning to animate and make videos for YouTube. It’s my connection to future work. A little bit of a security blanket too.

 

How has living in a truck impacted your artistic journey (thematically, pragmatically, etc.)?

Though I started drawing comics when I was fairly young, most of my career has been spent with sculpture and engineering. I’ve made puppets for nearly twenty years, including sewing the costumes, and painting the sets. In the truck I’ve been forced to narrow my focus to what I could accomplish in the space. Drawing and writing, mostly.

Even traditional drawing is hard to do in the truck. Ink gets too thick to use in the cold. My career has been built upon getting new work out often. It has to be in the internet age. Returning to comics is something I can accomplish with limited space, wifi, and access to power. It’s also a way to process the frustration and panic I frequently feel about my situation.

I’ve always talked about poverty, to one extent or another, in my work, but now it’s in sharp focus. I find so many situations that are darkly funny about the basic things I struggle with.

I have far more comic ideas than I’ll ever have time to draw. I’ve also wanted to do a video game which utilizes real scenarios I’ve found myself in as puzzle elements. So much of this is MacGuyvering my way through problems that come up. The comics are accomplishable though. Each one takes about five hours, which I can find time for. It’s a resource I have.

 

What’s next for “Trucked Up?”

I’ll keep drawing and posting to Instagram and Webtoons. I see there are some people who make decent money, once they get noticed, and build a following. I’m currently working on a mural for a client and that’s my main source of income, but it would be great if I could have something more stable and reliable. My income has been feast-or-famine for ten years, with almost constant stress. It would be nice to have some consistent money that I could plan for the future with.

I feel like I have a lot of ideas which extend beyond the scope of just living in the truck. I have a lot of life stories. Just the autobiographical content is enough for hundreds, or thousands of future comics, not to mention all the fictional stories I’d like to tell. Plus there are educational and instructional ideas I have. I’ve been teaching puppets over the years, and I can fold that into didactic drawings, maybe into a book.

 

Lennie & George from Of Mice and Men (Performed in 2012) -- PDX Local

Lennie & George from Of Mice and Men (Performed in 2012)

A Book Bar in Portland

A Book Bar in Portland

Rose City Book Pub - PDX LocalInterview with owner Elise Shumock

What was your inspiration for the book pub?
A couple of friends had dreamed it up as a pipe dream, and it sounded like something I could actually do. I was living in LA working as a private tutor and a Latin teacher, and I was looking for a way to get back home. In June 2015 I decided I could disentangle myself in June of 2018 without leaving anyone who was still depending on me, so I set that as my departure date and started planning how to get back home to Portland and open the Book Pub.

Are there any other book pubs like this — in Portland or the world?
For some reason, there wasn’t already a book pub in Portland. A lot of people have been surprised that we hadn’t done something like this already. Tugboat had a book theme, but it wasn’t a bookstore. There are other book pubs around the country. A few that I looked at for reference were in New York, DC, and Denver. I’ve heard there are quite a few in Europe.

What is your favorite book or books?
That’s a hard question. The book I return to every few years is Invisible Man by Ralph Ellison. I see something new in it every time I read it. The last few years I’ve been in love with Karl Ove Knausgaard. It’s part of my fantasy about the Book Pub that Karl Ove will come for a reading and I can have a few drinks with him. I identify very closely with Simone de Beauvoir.

How does it work? Is it a buy or a browse experience?
The Book Pub is a combination bookstore and bar and restaurant. The books are for sale. People are also allowed to bring their own books in to read, and they’re welcome to drink while they read books they haven’t bought yet, but we will ask people not to eat while they read our books. I think most readers have enough love for books that it won’t be a problem. I encourage people to buy a glass of wine or a pint of beer while they’re browsing.

How did you choose the location?
I gave my realtor a few parameters, and this was the property that was on the market that fit my needs. My priority was to find a place on the east side closer in than 72nd because I think I’ll have a local draw, but I also expect a citywide draw and so I didn’t want to be too far out. The other biggest priority was to be wheelchair accessible. I got a lot of things from my wish list, too: a back patio, an old building, lots of wood, and lots of taps. It also happens to be a few blocks from where I went to elementary school at Sabin, so I’m really pleased to be in a neighborhood where I already have roots.

What will the menu (food and beverage) be like?
I have 24 taps! I’m using a few for drinks other than beer: kombucha, cider, cold press coffee on nitro. Otherwise, lots of NW craft brews. I’ll have a house red and a house white as well as a rotating list of spendier wines. We’re going to have a limited cocktail list of 5 signature cocktails at a time, rotating with the flavors of the seasons, all using local spirits and other local ingredients. Otherwise, we will do highballs (1 booze, 1 mixer) of anything we have.

We have a core fixed menu of bistro/cafe style food. Cheese plate, charcuterie plate, warm baguette with Himalayan pink salted butter, a pork shoulder dish, a quinoa bowl, and a few other items. We are going to have a small rotating menu of soups, salads, pastas, and desserts to make use of seasonal ingredients.

When does it open?
I’m aiming for a very soft opening on October 14th, which may or may not happen. If we don’t make it by that day, it will be sometime soon after. We will definitely be open by November 3rd when I’m planning a Grand Opening Party 11 am until 2 am. I’m still working on the line up for that day, but lots of live music, a one-line joke open mic, a pinata, beer tastings, and a lot more.

I’m doing an Indiegogo to cover the costs of the built-in bookcases and the new bar top. It’s all just pre-sales at the same prices the items will be after I open.

Rose City Book Pub, 1329 NE Fremont Street
rosecitybookpub.com