Remote Mental Health Services

Remote Mental Health Services

Virtual Wellness Practitioners

In the time of COVID-19, we need access to quality therapists, coaches, and specialists now more than ever.  PDX Local has assembled a guide of Portland area service providers for mental health and holistic/physical health offering consultations by video and phone. If you have additional practitioners you would like to suggest, please contact us.

Coaches  | Therapists  | Other Service Providers

Can’t Wait? Visit the Crisis Resources page.

Therapists

Abri Radically Open DBT. Abri, based in Portland, Oregon, is one of the first psychotherapy clinics worldwide to specialize solely in Radically Open DBT for disorders of over-control. Both LiLin and Kirsten are on the RO DBT Senior Clinician team and are approved RO DBT trainers. They are enthusiastic practitioners of RO DBT, stay current with the research and have an active consultation team with other senior clinicians in the Northwest. Their mission is to provide excellent full-fidelity treatment in a lovely and inviting setting. (503) 386-1515

Connective Therapy Collective. Committed to intersectional, trauma-informed,
pleasure-centered clinical work in sex and gender. (971) 361-8303

The Counseling Umbrella. We are a mental health counseling private practice, committed to helping clients & our community engage around mental health issues. Masters in Professional Mental Health Counseling, Social Work.  (503) 473-1600 

Emerging Path Counseling, LLC. Mental Health counseling, general practice as well as specializing in trauma and anxiety. Stephanie Garneaux is a Licensed Professional Counselor, Certified Alcohol and Drug Counselor III, and a Certified Clinical Trauma Professional. She has worked in behavioral health for over 10 years, and as a Qualified Mental Health Professional since 2014. Stephanie has a Masters Degree in Community Mental Health Counseling. (971) 291-0579

Family Roots Therapy. Family Roots Therapy is a counseling practice in Portland, Oregon focused specifically on the unique mental health needs of new parents and young children. (503) 746-3373 

Kirgin Consulting. I am a Jungian psychologist and business/leadership consultant. I am working virtually with individuals, couples, leaders at this time. Contact Online

Marchick Counseling and Consulting. My philosophy is that in every stage in life there is an opportunity for personal growth and acceptance of self. Together we will evaluate the options available to you, discuss how to navigate family dynamics, create appropriate plans and strategies, and learn about self-care. Exploring and establishing healthy habits can help one find balance and feel success. (503) 683-3179

MindTree. I am a licensed child and family therapist primarily working with children ( 4 plus) and women. Currently offer virtual sessions! (503) 766-4895 

Rachael A Ringwood. Specializes in mood disorders such as depression, anxiety and bipolar conditions. (385) 203-7622 

Root and Bloom Counseling. Specializing in Holistic, Inclusive Pregnancy and Postpartum Counseling, Including Depression, Anxiety, Traumatic Births, Grief, and Loss. (503) 905-9839

Sarah Hart, Psychotherapy. My approach is dynamic & collaborative. I work from a culturally-informed, inclusive model & incorporate all aspects of an individual’s identity/experiences into treatment. My specialties include anxiety, depression, identity, Autism & relationships. (503) 967-9767

Urban Counseling Collective. We are open to new telehealth intakes for anyone that is wanting to begin psychological services or anyone needing additional support during this time of social distancing. 503-610-2044

Coaches

Alignment and Alchemy. Hi, I’m Sarah, and I help women reconnect with their authentic selves and achieve greater health and happiness through movement, mindfulness, and mindset. Contact online

Apothic Energy. Working from a place of love and genuine desire for all to have well being, Apothic Energy utilizes old and new energy medicine techniques to bring people into a true sense of health. Contact online

Alyssa Rose Healing Arts. My focus and passion rests with end of life care and working with grief. I find Craniosacral Therapy and unwinding to be extremely beneficial for people at this stage of life, and love this work. I also practice massage (relaxation, wellness, MVA’s, myofascial, and deep tissue). (503) 345-0530

Beatriz Reyna. Inner child work/shadow work/journeys into your inner world.

Beloved Coaching. I am a Sex and Intimacy Coach who has completed Advanced Training in the Somatica® Method. My heart’s work is to help people explore, deshamify, and celebrate their unique sexual selves. (971) 238-8131

Bipolar Life Coaching. Wellness and life coaching for persons living with mood disorders and their loved ones. Contact Online

Coach Woida. Certified life coach specializing in mental health, building confidence and emotional intelligence. (802) 498-5062 

The Courage Practice. The Courage Practice is offering FREE intuitive 1:1 coaching sessions via Zoom throughout April. Please share the love with someone you love. We are here for you and your community, friends. Contact online

Emanating Medicine. 1:1 coaching for emotional/trauma/shadow integration sessions. Contact online

Grief Warrior. I hope to soften the armor of grief by validating the pain and witnessing the emotion. Together, let’s make sure that the grieving know they are not alone. (800) 901-4617

Grounded Alignment. The Grounded Alignment work incorporates tools and practices from several disciplines, including guided breathing/visualization exercises, writing and daily practices. Contact online

Enhance Your Life. I work with heart-centered healers & women in business to create their ideal life. With over 30 years experience, Jan is a Transformational Coach, whose background includes: Tapping Into Wealth coach program, Naturopathic Physician (ret) instructor/speaker, hypnotherapist, and behavior therapy. (503) 593-3360

HealingWaze. Holistic Health Directory.

Inner Skye Counseling. Our inner world is multi-faceted, like the terrain of the Sky(e). I am honored and inspired to join you in navigating your inner landscapes. Now offering telehealth therapy sessions. (971) 361-8861 

Julia Phoenix. Relationship coach, speaker and transformational healer. Email questions. Contact online

Julie Papcup. Personal coaching and tapping. Contact online

Lauren Drake Coaching. I help women live in alignment with their soul callings, so they can find more peace, ease, and wealth. Contact online

Lenore Hypnosis. I do a lot of work with confidence and helping people gain control over feelings of anxiety, fear, and insecurity. (425) 985-7916 

Light Heart Society. Holistic life coaching for creatives. Contact online

MCHealth Life Coach. I have a private Health & Life Coach practice where I specialize in transformational habit change, being an advocate for living healthy, and an accountability partner to keep you striving to reach your ultimate goals. Contact online

Myrissa Otterbein-Pyle. 1:1 Lifestyle coaching. Psychedelic consultations and integration. Contact online

The Nature In You. Katrina Nilsson-Gorman, is a certified Nature and Forest Therapy Guide and Intuitive Healer. She holds certifications with The Association of Nature and Forest Therapy, the Tree of Totems Spiritual Wilderness School as an Ayu-Shamanic Practitioner, and a Bachelor of Arts from The University of Puget Sound in Music and English. (970) 556-4562

Nurture Life Coaching. Certified Life Coach & Licensed Massage Therapist, Focusing on Women and LGTBQ Individuals. Cultivating your inner clarity for positive change. (503) 473-4754

Rachel Li Coach. Rachel works with leaders to offer soulful solutions to the disquiet spoiling the workplace. If you are tired from too much screen staring and from having partially present dialogues come recharge with some deep healing. Contact online

Soul Talk Coaching. Phone support for LGBTQIA + Individuals, couples, and families, help with anxiety, depression, dating, relationships, family, career, financial worries, spiritual growth, and much more. Contact online

Stella Harris. I’m a certified intimacy educator and professional coach. In addition to my direct work with clients and students, I work with professionals such as therapists and educators in the hopes of putting myself out of a job. (503) 568-1275

The Vital Spirit. I am an empath, spiritual teacher, and intuitive healer living in Portland, Oregon. I created The Vital Spirit to be an instrument in the ongoing shift in human consciousness. I serve empaths and lightworkers through intuitive energy alignment and strategic business consulting. I align my clients with their true nature and their spirit-led businesses. (503) 784-3119

Sophia Treyger. Sophia is a Relationship & Intimacy Coach, and owner of Radical Pleasurist, teaching the global community how to have meaningful and deeply connected relationships through embodiment, courageous communication, and the creation of genuine agreements without needing to be a people-pleaser. Radical Pleasurist shifts people from pleaser to pleasure. Contact Online

Other Providers

Arbor Vitae. Massage & Somatic Therapies for every body, mind and spirit. Tap into the root of health at ARBOR VITAE. (503) 367-7659

Aurora Remember. My mission is to help Highly Excitable people use their fire without getting burned by connecting with their powers, balance their energy and feel a sense of accomplishment in their life. Contact Online

Bipolar Life Coaching. Wellness and life coaching for persons living with mood disorders and their loved ones. Contact Online

The Brain Breakthrough. Unlocking Your Brain’s Potential! Breakthrough anxiety, trauma, reading struggles, and concussions! (971) 231-5214

The Bodhi Tree. Dr. Sage Dillon The Bodhi Tree offering exercise, rehab, nutritional counseling, exams for new or old musculoskeletal injuries and referrals to imaging. I am also able to answer questions if somenone is unclear if they need to go to ED. Insurance is accepted for telehealth if you are in OR. (503) 331-1800

Dovetail College Counseling.  Amy Romm Lockard is a dedicated college admissions expert and founder of Dovetail College Consulting. M.S.Ed. (609) 706-6492

Fit Body Boot Camp. Online coaching with our members until we can open up again! Contact Online

Flying Squirrel Consulting Partners, LLC. I am offering discounted virtual business coaching: survival and recovery strategy. Flying Squirrel provides flexible support services for motivated business owners who are seeking mentoring, coaching, & experienced perspective. (503) 926-3601

Ikigai Wellness. Walking along in your journey of life, you’ve come across physical trauma, difficulties and stressors that have affected you in many ways. Your health is the foundation you walk on, a wholistic environment comprised of your physical, mental-emotional and spiritual well-being. My purpose is to assist you with reducing your pain naturally, finding your balance and returning to the activities you love. (503) 308-8676

Kirin Bhatti. Earth-Based Healing+Strategy Guided By The Rhythms Of The Seasons And Our Bodies. For The Change-Makers, Leaders And Healers Who Are Hungry To Resurrect Ancient Blueprints On How To Lead And Live Naturally. Email

New // Narratives. Robin Carlisle is a Multidisciplinary Healing Arts Practitioner, working with a wide range of therapeutic modalities from Cognitive Behavioral Therapy to Mindfulness, as well as variety of Somatic practices. (503) 457-2749

Prenatal and Postpartum Online Resources. An online spreadsheet of area providers offering virtual services.

Radical Wellbeing Body Work. Licensed Massage Therapist. Movement Teacher. Medicinal Poet. Priestess of the New Paradigm. (503) 662-2490

The Raw & Wild Hearts. Virtual wellness consultations and hypnotherapy sessions. Contact Online

Sol Food Nutrition. Iris Briand, RDN. Customized nutrition coaching. 541.908.0632

Tara Jade Nichols. Star Alchemy ~ a seemingly magical process of turning one’s life into gold. Astrology readings allow for discovery of your Soul’s contract, blessings, and challenges. This insight can lead to significant personal growth. Contact online

Disclaimer: This article is not intended to give health or fitness advice. Exercise at your own risk. Consult your doctor or another health professional if you are unsure whether a service or form of therapy is safe for you to use. All opinions expressed are those solely of the PDX Local blog, and do not represent its sponsors, affiliates, or guest contributors. No paid advertising or paid endorsements have been provided for the products featured above. The reviewer makes no claims regarding the efficacy, workmanship, utility, or safety of any of the products listed above. 

Bipolar Awareness

Bipolar Awareness

Today is National Bipolar Awareness Day

Education is key.

March 30, 2020

Some things you should know about me: I am Bipolar Type I. I had my driver’s license taken away by the state of Massachusetts without cause in May 2016; that was why I moved to Oregon. I figured it was someplace I could get a job and be financially independent whether or not I was able to get my license back. (And yes, I did get it back by the way.)

I have always considered myself a success story. A poster child for treatment and medication. And I’ve been able to achieve a lot in the past 20 years since diagnosis.

A friend who suffers from anxiety and depression told me, “I  figured you had all of the same problems as me, only worse.”

No, not really. I don’t have a personality disorder. I never really had any serious issues with trauma until a year and a half ago.

One in 23 Americans experience bipolar at some point in their lives. Many bipolar people experience no symptoms at all with medication. They are able to go back to normal life.  Most people with bipolar disorder are closeted, and that is because the stigma is so bad. We are always at risk for gaslighting. Many people will not willingly associate with us. Yet I have close friends, clients, and professional colleagues that knew me for years before I ever told them my diagnosis. They said they said they never would have guessed.

I happen to believe that stigma, even more than the disease, is why our death rate is so high. How high? About 15% over a lifetime. To put that in perspective, annualized over the first 50 years after diagnosis, the risk of suicide if you are bipolar is about one third as high as the risk of dying from COVID-19. They are comparable.

The bipolar death rate is probably quite a bit higher in actuality, as many suicides are not reported as such and because the disease strikes people most commonly in their teens and twenties. I am told that if you can make it past middle age, symptoms decrease, particularly for women. This has proved true for my mother, who is also bipolar.

For me a lot seems to do with having access to the right formulation of Lithium (brand name vs. generic).  Switching to brand name Lithium (Lithane) worked wonders for me, probably because the quality control and dosage standards are much higher. The catch is that this formulation is at present only available in Canada. I am working with a Vancouver local to get my prescription picked up and shipped to the U.S.A. Wish me luck.

What is it like to have a manic episode? It’s hard to describe. A mild manic episode is disorienting and disabling — you can’t really work except for simple tasks like housework or cleaning. Inhibitions are lowered. You might do things you would do if you were drunk, like have a fling with someone or buy stuff you don’t need on Amazon.

A full-blown psychotic manic episode is very different. It’s more like a hallucinogenic drug trip — and we’re not talking microdoses. It puts you in a different reality. For example, I might wander outside my house and onto the bridge nearby, not really knowing what I am doing or where I am. I might get on a bus and just ride for half an hour.

There is a mystical component. You feel like you are at one with the universe. Music sounds amazing. Colors and tastes are more more intense. Some bipolar people enjoy the “high.” I have never sought it out. For that matter, I’ve never tried any drug stronger than pot. It’s not that I’m not curious. Just too risky with my brain chemistry.

For me, mania has always been highly correlated with insomnia and sleep disruption. Psychotic mania can be treated successfully at home, if you have the right drugs. The safest option is probably to go inpatient.

Not much happens in a mental hospital. There are no miracle drugs or aggressive treatments. You just take your Perphenazine and mill about in a safe place where you can’t do (much) damage to yourself or others, eat bad food, try to focus your concentration enough to play a card game or read a few pages out of a book, and wait until someone decides you’re well enough to go home.

To be honest, it feels a lot like… now.

Like the Coronavirus Lockdown.

The same boredom. The same impatience. For those who have never been through something like this before, the only advice I can give is to try to keep yourself occupied, and try to be courteous and respectful to the people around you. This too shall pass.


Read my story here.

For more resources, articles, and advice on living with bipolar and being present for the bipolar people in your life, visit my Quora page or my coaching website.

Please note: I am not currently accepting new long-term clients. 

Crisis Resources

Crisis Resources

We’ve put together a list of helpful national and local Portland, OR and Seattle, WA resources for mental health and suicide prevention, updated for COVID-19. Please let us know if any of these links are broken, or if you have new ones to suggest. Thank you, and be well.

Helplines

https://suicidepreventionlifeline.org The National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 1-800-273-8255 provides 24/7, free and confidential support for people in distress, prevention and crisis resources for you or your loved ones, and best practices for professionals. Telephone and online chat available.

https://oregonyouthline.org For teens, they can call, text, chat and during certain hours can talk to peer support.

https://www.crisistextline.org Crisis Text Line, text HOME to 741741.

http://communitycounselingsolutions.org/warmline  A peer-run program of Community Counseling Solutions.

https://www.translifeline.org – Peer support, hotline, and resources for the trans community.

https://www.thetrevorproject.org – A national 24-hour, toll free confidential suicide hotline for LGBTQ youth.

1-855-227-3640 – Caregiver Help Desk Hotline

Clackamas County Mental Health Crisis Line (503) 655-8585


Multnomah County Mental Health Crisis Line (503) 988-4888


Washington County Mental Health Crisis Line (503) 291-9111


Thero Directory

Seattle Mental Health Crisis Line (866) 427-4747

Suicide Prevention Cards - PDX Local

Community Resources

https://www.nami.org NAMI, the National Alliance on Mental Illness, is the nation’s largest grassroots mental health organization dedicated to building better lives for the millions of Americans affected by mental illness. Oregon NAMI Chapter: https://namior.org/

http://gettrainedtohelp.com – Suicide First Aid. Free trainings in suicide prevention for the general public, youth workers, and more. Includes the ASIST curriculum. Trainings temporarily suspended.

https://www.facebook.com/groups/stjohnssuicideprevention – St. John’s Suicide Prevention Team. A community group helping reduce the incidence of suicides in Portland, Oregon and the St. John’s neighborhood.

https://multco.us/mhas/mental-health-crisis-intervention – Multnomah Crisis Intervention Resources (includes walk-in clinic).

https://www.co.washington.or.us/hawthorn – Walk-in trauma intervention program in Washington County.

http://www.seattlecrisis.org/counseling.html – Counseling and mental health resources for Seattle, WA.

https://www.mentalhealthfirstaid.org – Nationwide organization providing training to help someone who is developing a mental health problem or experiencing a crisis.

https://www.samhsa.gov/ebp-resource-center/ – Federally funded Evidence Based Practices Resource Center for mental and substance abuse disorders.

https://www.drugrehab.com/guides/suicide-risks/ – A guide to understanding the connection between Substance Abuse & Suicide.

Coaching

https://bipolarlifecoach.com – A Portland-based practice offering one-on-one coaching to individuals with mood disorders, and their family and loved ones. Sliding scale spots available.

http://www.juliefast.com/ – A Portland-based site offering books and resources to individuals living with bipolar. The author also offers coaching services.

Suicide Prevention Cards - PDX Local

Hashtags

#endsuicide #worldmentalhealthday #suicideawareness

 

Suicide Resources

Suicide Resources

I’ve put together a list of helpful national and local Portland, OR and Seattle, WA resources for mental health and suicide prevention. This list reflects that there is no one-size fits all solution — text or online chat may be a better option for somebody who doesn’t have privacy to talk, and with “warmlines,” people may wish to seek help even if their life is not imminently in danger. Please let me know if any of these links are broken, or if you have new ones to suggest. Thank you, and be well.

Card Making Session - PDX Local

Founding Members of the St. John’s Suicide Prevention Team: Elizabeth Gadwa, Laura Bee, and Kristen Gray

Helplines

https://suicidepreventionlifeline.org The National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 1-800-273-8255 provides 24/7, free and confidential support for people in distress, prevention and crisis resources for you or your loved ones, and best practices for professionals. Telephone and online chat available.

https://oregonyouthline.org For teens, they can call, text, chat and during certain hours can talk to peer support.

https://www.crisistextline.org Crisis Text Line, text HOME to 741741.

http://communitycounselingsolutions.org/warmline  A peer-run program of Community Counseling Solutions.

https://www.thinkpacifica.com/anxiety-peer-support-groups  Free online support peer support groups for stress, anxiety & depression.

https://www.translifeline.org – Peer support, hotline, and resources for the trans community.

https://www.thetrevorproject.org – A national 24-hour, toll free confidential suicide hotline for LGBTQ youth.

877-226-3111 – Addiction Hotline

1-855-227-3640 – Caregiver Help Desk Hotline

503-300-1633 – Clackamas Senior Loneliness Line

844-228-2962 – Eating Disorder Hotline

877-455-0628 – Self Harm Hotline

888-640-5174 – Depression Hotline

Clackamas County Mental Health Crisis Line (503) 655-8585


Multnomah County Mental Health Crisis Line (503) 988-4888


Washington County Mental Health Crisis Line (503) 291-9111


Thero Directory

Seattle Mental Health Crisis Line (866) 427-4747

Suicide Prevention Cards - PDX Local

Community Resources

https://www.nami.org NAMI, the National Alliance on Mental Illness, is the nation’s largest grassroots mental health organization dedicated to building better lives for the millions of Americans affected by mental illness. Oregon NAMI Chapter: https://namior.org/

http://gettrainedtohelp.com – Suicide First Aid. Free trainings in suicide prevention for the general public, youth workers, and more. Includes the ASIST curriculum.

https://www.facebook.com/groups/stjohnssuicideprevention – St. John’s Suicide Prevention Team. A community group helping reduce the incidence of suicides in Portland, Oregon and the St. John’s neighborhood.

https://multco.us/mhas/mental-health-crisis-intervention – Multnomah Crisis Intervention Resources (includes walk-in clinic).

https://www.co.washington.or.us/hawthorn – Walk-in trauma intervention program in Washington County.

http://www.seattlecrisis.org/counseling.html – Counseling and mental health resources for Seattle, WA.

https://www.mentalhealthfirstaid.org – Nationwide organization providing training to help someone who is developing a mental health problem or experiencing a crisis.

https://www.samhsa.gov/ebp-resource-center/ – Federally funded Evidence Based Practices Resource Center for mental and substance abuse disorders.

https://www.drugrehab.com/guides/suicide-risks/ – A guide to understanding the connection between Substance Abuse & Suicide.

Coaching

https://bipolarlifecoach.com – A Portland-based practice offering one-on-one coaching to individuals with mood disorders, and their family and loved ones. Sliding scale spots available.

http://www.juliefast.com/ – A Portland-based site offering books and resources to individuals living with bipolar. The author also offers coaching services.

Suicide Prevention Cards - PDX Local

Hashtags

#endsuicide #worldmentalhealthday #suicideawareness

 

Under the Bridge

Under the Bridge

Beth Gadwa, Bipolar Life Coach

Me, standing under the St. John’s Bridge in my neighborhood in Portland, Oregon. The bridge is the site of weddings, festivals, film shoots, and deaths.

How to Save a Million Lives

It starts with being visible.

November 2, 2019

In anyone’s memory, certain dates stand out forever.

I remember standing in my aunt and uncle’s sunny family room in San Mateo, California on April 18, 2018. That was when the customer service rep on the phone told me I did not qualify for life insurance. This was a problem. In fact, it was a huge problem. It meant I would not be able to obtain what is called “Key Man” Insurance, which shields professional investors in case of the accidental or untimely death of the CEO or other essential team members. Key Man Insurance is a must for any startup seeking serious investor funding (seed round or VC). Unknowingly, I had raised funds from friends and family for a venture that could not succeed with me at the helm.

I checked it out. I got a second quote. It didn’t matter that I was healthy and had managed the condition successfully for 19 years.

This wasn’t a case of bias, or stigma. It was a numbers game. The diagnosis is bipolar disorder. The reason I couldn’t get life insurance was that my diagnosis carries a 15 – 20% lifetime fatality rate. That means that as many as one in five people with bipolar disorder may die by suicide. (National Institute of Mental Health, as cited by DBSA.)

If present trends continue, over 855,000 of the 5.7 million individuals living today with bipolar disorder in the U.S will die by suicide. That’s almost a million people.

We are living in the middle of an epidemic. And one ever seems to notice.

Our company’s investor woes seemed pretty trivial in comparison.

Which brings me to the other date. Just over a year ago.

October 17, 2018

On that single day, in my home city of Portland, Oregon, we lost three people to suicide. One of the deaths happened a few hundred feet from my apartment, when a woman jumped off the St. John’s Bridge. I found out when I heard the sirens and saw the flashing red lights. I took some roses out of a vase, went outside, walked down the hill, and put the roses by the police line.

For me, that death brought home the reality of the suicide epidemic in America. I don’t know whether any of the three people who died had a diagnosis, but given the high risk factor and the fact that 1 in 23 Americans are bipolar, it is likely. Suicide fatality rates are actually higher for people with bipolar disorder than for those with unipolar depression(NCBI). Because suicide is a social epidemic, the death of one individual can result in the deaths of other individuals, who may not even share the same diagnosis. There a lot of reasons why this post has been hard for me to write. One of them is that this year, in the time since I started writing this blog post, about three weeks ago, I learned of two other likely suicides in my home communities: one here in Oregon and one in Massachusetts. The taboo around speaking about suicide is strong, just like the taboo against discussing bipolar disorder. I went to a walk this month by the American Society for Suicide Prevention. It’s a worthy event, and it does a lot of good for survivors. But nowhere — nowhere — was bipolar disorder mentioned as a cause or a killer. Talking about America’s suicide epidemic without talking about bipolar is like trying to talk about heart disease and never mentioning high blood pressure.

Last fall it felt like the bodies were literally dropping from overhead. Those deaths, in particular the one so close to home, jolted me out of complacency. I kept thinking to myself, If fifteen percent of bipolar people are dying by suicide, why don’t we hear about it? Why aren’t we doing more to stop it?”

I had been marked as a plague victim and I didn’t even know it.

I found a replacement CEO for my startup. After stepping down, my plan had been to take a course or two in data science and rejoin the corporate world. Instead, I found myself on an entirely different path. I earned a certification in Life Coaching, another as a Peer Support Specialist, and completed the excellent QPR suicide prevention training which is offered for free to lay people in the Portland area. The goal: work part time coaching bipolar and entrepreneurial clients from around the world. Spend the rest of my time building something cool.

The crazy thing is, one year later it actually seems to have worked.

The people I have coached confound my expectations. They are C-level executives, computer programmers, bankers, and accountants. Leave every expectation you have surrounding bipolar people and their temperament or personality type at the door. Just know, above all, we are here. And there are a lot of us. The recovery rate for bipolar disorder is 80%. (Health Central) Mostly you can’t tell us apart from anybody else. Because when the medication works well for us, like most other Americans, we’d much rather concentrate on our lives and families and hobbies than on getting riled up with anything that resembles activism.

Coaching is intense. I have had more than one occasion where the client burst into tears during the first session. Unlike therapy, the emphasis is on achieving short term goals. Most of my service offerings are designed to last 3-6 sessions, although some clients stay on much longer. I think my favorite sessions are the outdoor fitness sessions, where we do the coaching during an hourlong walk or hike. I never agree to work with a client unless they are also seeing a licensed doctor or clinician. Confidentiality is key. In the event of a situation where someone’s safety is at risk or where someone expresses suicidal thoughts, I will of course contact emergency services, as well as other members of a client’s care team.

Whatever assorted coaching gurus may promise, my type of coaching won’t make you rich. That’s not why I do it. I just know that it’s important for bipolar people to be visible.

This is where the saving lives come in. It’s about much more than the coaching, although I believe that’s important and meaningful work. It’s about being visible, and letting people know that bipolar gets better. Coming out is risky, and it has a cost. You may not get asked on that second date. As a programmer the last thing you want is your supervisor wondering what medications you were taking when you pushed that last commit! But I’ve come to believe that the cost of silence is greater. Silence equals death. Stigma equals death.

Here’s how we can save one million lives over the next generation:

1.) Make stigma against bipolar people unacceptable. End the jokes. Stop using bipolar as shorthand for a personality disorder. Educate yourselves. This shouldn’t be my job, as the person with the disability, but I need to take responsibility first and foremost for my own actions. I am not “out” in every professional or social social situation, but I try to live my life in a way that I can communicate to others, who may be more closeted, that there is hope.

2.) Improve quality and access to mental health care. Bipolar people face special challenges. We encounter more stigma than people with depression or anxiety disorders, and if we are misdiagnosed, the consequences can be serious. But all mental health conditions deserve treatment on a par with physical health. The quality of generic medications has taken an alarming dive. I have experienced these issues myself, and heard alarming reports from others. Legal or regulatory action must be taken to ensure that vulnerable populations do not suffer.

3.) Work for a cure. Amazingly, for a disease that affects millions of Americans and people the world over, we still do not understand the causes of bipolar disorder. It receives only a fraction of the federal funding for diseases with a similar mortality rate. Meanwhile, the pharmaceutical industry shows off its latest advances: a pill with a tracking device to make sure the patient complies and takes their medication. We are solving for the wrong goal here.

You may have noticed that the beginning of this piece promised to tell you how to save one million lives.  And you may have noticed that based on the figures above, we’re still 145,000 lives short. There’s a reason for that. The reason is that bipolar people, when we are well and healthy, save lives.

The reason is that bipolar people are our best and our brightest. We are leaders. We are artists. We are entrepreneurs and innovators. We are mystics. We are heroes. We feel deeply, and we act on the courage of our convictions. From Winston Churchill to Kanye West, the names of famous bipolar people read like a roll call. Bipolar people who are able to live out their lives to their fullest potential will design lifesaving vaccines, help mitigate climate change, and create songs and stories that sustain and offer hope for an imperiled planet. We give back every day. We are mothers and fathers, aunts and uncles, teachers and mentors, some of the best and most loyal friends you will ever find. We are generous. We go the extra mile. Maybe we are still trying to prove we are “good enough.” Maybe deep down we know that we different, and also blessed. There is a reason we are in this genome.

We have so much to give, and we are irreplaceable.

 


 

Find free crisis resources in the Pacific Northwest and nationwide.

Learn more about my bipolar coaching practice at www.bipolarlifecoaching.com.

Read my advice posts on Quora.

Listen to a radio spot: